Aspects of Stop Consonant Production by Pediatric Users of Cochlear Implants Purpose: Data and analyses are reported for stop consonant production by 12 children who have used cochlear implants for at least 5 years, focusing on variation within and between individual phonological systems. Method: Participants were 6 oral communication users and 6 total communication users. Productions of single words were analyzed ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2002
Aspects of Stop Consonant Production by Pediatric Users of Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven B. Chin, PhD
    Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis
  • Contact author: Steven B. Chin, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Dept. of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, 699 West Drive, RR044, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5119.
    Contact author: Steven B. Chin, PhD, Indiana University School of Medicine, Dept. of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, 699 West Drive, RR044, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5119.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: schin@iupui.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2002
Aspects of Stop Consonant Production by Pediatric Users of Cochlear Implants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2002, Vol. 33, 38-51. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/004)
History: Received January 22, 2001 , Accepted October 3, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2002, Vol. 33, 38-51. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/004)
History: Received January 22, 2001; Accepted October 3, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

Purpose: Data and analyses are reported for stop consonant production by 12 children who have used cochlear implants for at least 5 years, focusing on variation within and between individual phonological systems.

Method: Participants were 6 oral communication users and 6 total communication users. Productions of single words were analyzed for stop inventories, phonotactic constraints, and morphophonemic alternations. Variation was further analyzed within optimality theory.

Results: Children’s inventories differed from English mainly in having additional, non-English stops. Total communication users had fewer ambient stops and more nonambient ones than did oral communication users. Control over English allophonic and neutralization rules varied among children. Phonological variation could be accounted for by positing unique underlying representations and different constraint rankings within optimality theory.

Clinical Implications: Atypical speech by children with cochlear implants involves both articulation and phonological organization. Although children vary considerably, characteristic patterns emerge. An understanding of these patterns is useful for identifying areas of difficulty and formulating intervention programs.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to Indiana University (R03DC03852 and R01DC00423) and from the Indiana University Strategic Directions Charter Fund. Earlier versions of this work were presented at CI2000: The 6th International Cochlear Implant Conference (Miami Beach, Florida) and at the 2000 Child Phonology Conference, University of Northern Iowa (Cedar Falls, Iowa). I am grateful to Cara L. Lento for assistance with data acquisition and phonetic transcription; to the St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (St. Louis, Missouri), where some of the children described in this study attend school; and to Kevin R. Finnegan for assistance with preparation of this manuscript.
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