The Lexicon and Phonology Interactions in Language Acquisition Clinical Forum
EDITOR'S AWARD
Clinical Forum  |   January 01, 2002
The Lexicon and Phonology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly L. Storkel
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Michele L. Morrisette
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Kansas.
    Currently affiliated with the University of Kansas.×
  • Contact author: Holly L. Storkel, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, 3001 Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045
    Contact author: Holly L. Storkel, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, 3001 Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: hstorkel@ku.edu
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   January 01, 2002
The Lexicon and Phonology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2002, Vol. 33, 24-37. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/003)
History: Received June 28, 2001 , Accepted October 3, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2002, Vol. 33, 24-37. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2002/003)
History: Received June 28, 2001; Accepted October 3, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 63

The purpose of this paper is to underscore the importance of the link between lexical and phonological acquisition by considering learning by children beyond the 50-word stage and by applying cognitive models of spoken word processing to development. Lexical and phonological variables that have been shown to influence perception and production across the lifespan are considered relative to their potential role in learning by preschool children. The effect of these lexical and phonological variables on perception, production, and learning are discussed in the context of a two-representation connectionist model of spoken word processing. The model appears to offer insights into the complex interaction between the lexicon and phonology and may be useful for clinical diagnosis and treatment of children with language delays.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health to Indiana University, Bloomington (DC01694; DC00012; DC04781). We appreciate the insightful comments and discussion provided by Judith A. Gierut, Jessica A. Barlow, and an anonymous reviewer on previous versions of this manuscript.
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