Epilogue: Recent Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment In phonological remediation, the ultimate goal is to bring the child’s sound system in line with the target system. This inevitably requires introducing new structure into the child’s grammar—structure that is relatively complex simply because it is absent from the child’s sound system. Thus, a common theme across all of ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2001
Epilogue: Recent Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica A. Barlow
    San Diego State University, CA
  • Contact author: Jessica A. Barlow, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanille Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1518.
    Contact author: Jessica A. Barlow, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanille Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1518.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jbarlow@mail.sdsu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2001
Epilogue: Recent Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 295-297. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/026)
History: Received June 28, 2001 , Accepted July 12, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 295-297. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/026)
History: Received June 28, 2001; Accepted July 12, 2001
In phonological remediation, the ultimate goal is to bring the child’s sound system in line with the target system. This inevitably requires introducing new structure into the child’s grammar—structure that is relatively complex simply because it is absent from the child’s sound system. Thus, a common theme across all of the articles of this clinical forum has been the role of complexity in some form or another. In the paragraphs that follow, the role of complexity is discussed with respect to each of the forum contributions. Each of the papers makes recommendations about analysis and treatment procedures that in many ways differ from conventional (process-based) practice within the field of speech-language pathology. These differences also are considered throughout.
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