Prosodic Patterns in Children's Multisyllabic Word Productions This paper reviews results from a series of studies that examined the influence of metrical and segmental effects on English-speaking children's multisyllabic word productions. Three different approaches (prosodic structure, trochaic template, and perceptual salience) that have been proposed in the literature to account for children's prosodic patterns are presented and ... Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment  |   October 2001
Prosodic Patterns in Children's Multisyllabic Word Productions
 
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Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment   |   October 2001
Prosodic Patterns in Children's Multisyllabic Word Productions
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 284-294. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/025)
History: Received May 1, 2001 , Accepted July 9, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 284-294. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/025)
History: Received May 1, 2001; Accepted July 9, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

This paper reviews results from a series of studies that examined the influence of metrical and segmental effects on English-speaking children's multisyllabic word productions. Three different approaches (prosodic structure, trochaic template, and perceptual salience) that have been proposed in the literature to account for children's prosodic patterns are presented and evaluated. An analysis of children's truncation or syllable deletion patterns revealed the following robust findings: (a) Stressed and word-final unstressed syllables are preserved more frequently than nonfinal unstressed syllables, (b) word-internal unstressed syllables with obstruent onsets are preserved more frequently than word-internal syllables with sonorant onsets, (c) unstressed syllables with non-reduced vowels are preserved more frequently than unstressed syllables with reduced vowels, and (d) right-sided stressed syllables are preserved more frequently than left-sided stressed syllables. An analysis of children's stress patterns revealed that children made greater numbers of stress errors in target words with irregular stress. Clinical implications of these findings are presented and additional studies that have applied a metrical approach to clinical populations are described.

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