Implicationally Related Error Patterns and the Selection of Treatment Targets This paper compares some of the different claims that have been made concerning acquisition by traditional rule-based derivational theories and the more recent framework of optimality theory. Case studies of children with phonological delays are examined with special attention given to two seemingly independent error patterns, namely, place harmony and ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2001
Implicationally Related Error Patterns and the Selection of Treatment Targets
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel A. Dinnsen
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Kathleen M. O’Connor
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Daniel A. Dinnsen, PhD, Department of Linguistics, Memorial Hall 322, 1021 East 3rd Street, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
    Contact author: Daniel A. Dinnsen, PhD, Department of Linguistics, Memorial Hall 322, 1021 East 3rd Street, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dinnsen@indiana.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Advances in Phonological Theory and Treatment
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2001
Implicationally Related Error Patterns and the Selection of Treatment Targets
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 257-270. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/023)
History: Received April 6, 2001 , Accepted July 6, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 257-270. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/023)
History: Received April 6, 2001; Accepted July 6, 2001

This paper compares some of the different claims that have been made concerning acquisition by traditional rule-based derivational theories and the more recent framework of optimality theory. Case studies of children with phonological delays are examined with special attention given to two seemingly independent error patterns, namely, place harmony and spirantization. Contrary to the expectations of derivational theories, these (and other) error patterns are argued to be implicationally related. Optimality theory is shown to offer a principled explanation for the facts with novel implications for clinical treatment.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We are especially grateful to Judith Gierut and Laura McGarrity for their ongoing discussions with us regarding all aspects of this work. We also have benefited from the helpful comments of Ruth Bahr, Jessica Barlow, and two anonymous reviewers. This work was supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (DC01694) to Indiana University.
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