Collaborating to Obtain Phonological Acquisition Data for Local Schools Purpose: Twelve school-based speech-language practitioners enlisted the assistance of a university clinical phonologist to help them implement a collaborative research project for their school system in order to investigate phonological acquisition. Method: The school practitioners transcribed speech samples of 520 typically developing children between the ages of 2:6 and 8:0 ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2001
Collaborating to Obtain Phonological Acquisition Data for Local Schools
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith Halvorsen Porter
    Riverside County Schools, CA
  • Barbara Williams Hodson
    Wichita State University, KS
  • Contact author: Barbara W. Hodson, Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0075.
    Contact author: Barbara W. Hodson, Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0075.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Barbara.Hodson@Wichita.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Evidence-Based Practice and Research Collaborations
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2001
Collaborating to Obtain Phonological Acquisition Data for Local Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2001, Vol. 32, 165-171. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/015)
History: Received June 12, 2000 , Accepted March 24, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2001, Vol. 32, 165-171. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/015)
History: Received June 12, 2000; Accepted March 24, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

Purpose: Twelve school-based speech-language practitioners enlisted the assistance of a university clinical phonologist to help them implement a collaborative research project for their school system in order to investigate phonological acquisition.

Method: The school practitioners transcribed speech samples of 520 typically developing children between the ages of 2:6 and 8:0 (years:months). Responses were coded for syllable/word structures (e.g., final consonant deletion) and phoneme classes (e.g., velar deficiencies).

Results: The 3-year-olds in this sample had acquired all major phoneme classes except liquids. For the older participants, /l/was acquired between 4 and 5 years of age and /r/between 5 and 6 years of age. Although the strident phoneme class had reached the criterion for acquisition by age 3 years, sibilant lisps were still common until the age of 7 years. Another finding was the rare occurrence of omissions.

Clinical Implications: The practitioners resolved that when determining whether a preschooler would be eligible to receive treatment services as a part of their caseloads, consistent speech sound omissions appeared to be a critical indicator and should be considered a higher priority than substitutions and/or distortions.

Conclusion: The collaborative effort between the university clinical phonologist and the school-based speech-language practitioners was considered to be a valuable experience and a model for future collaborative partnerships.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors want to thank Lisa Butterfield, Dona Carrell, Sandra Comedena, Lyn Elliot, Catherine Emery, Mary Hillard, Eileen Landes, Marianne Morgan Cope, Donna Swenson, Lynee Tierre, and Gloria Wagers for their participation in the data collection process. We also wish to acknowledge the Office of the Superintendent of Riverside County schools for awarding an incentive grant for this project. In addition, we want to thank Kenn Apel, Elaine Silliman, and three anonymous reviewers for their excellent editorial suggestions.
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