An Initial Investigation of Phonological Patterns in Typically Developing 4-Year-Old Spanish-English Bilingual Children Purpose: This collaborative study investigated phonological patterns in 12 typically developing 4-year-old bilingual (Spanish-English) children. Method: A single-word phonological assessment with separate versions for English and Spanish was administered to each child. Analyses consisted of a phonetic inventory; percentage of consonants correct; percentage of consonants correct for voicing, place of ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2001
An Initial Investigation of Phonological Patterns in Typically Developing 4-Year-Old Spanish-English Bilingual Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian Goldstein, PhD
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Patricia Swasey Washington
    Camden City School District, Camden, NJ
  • Contact author: Brian Goldstein, PhD, Temple University, Communication Sciences, 109 Weiss Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122.
    Contact author: Brian Goldstein, PhD, Temple University, Communication Sciences, 109 Weiss Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: briang@temple.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Evidence-Based Practice and Research Collaborations
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2001
An Initial Investigation of Phonological Patterns in Typically Developing 4-Year-Old Spanish-English Bilingual Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2001, Vol. 32, 153-164. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/014)
History: Received August 29, 2000 , Accepted March 24, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2001, Vol. 32, 153-164. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/014)
History: Received August 29, 2000; Accepted March 24, 2001

Purpose: This collaborative study investigated phonological patterns in 12 typically developing 4-year-old bilingual (Spanish-English) children.

Method: A single-word phonological assessment with separate versions for English and Spanish was administered to each child. Analyses consisted of a phonetic inventory; percentage of consonants correct; percentage of consonants correct for voicing, place of articulation, and manner of articulation; and the percentage of occurrence for phonological processes.

Results: The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the two languages on percentage of consonants correct; percentage of consonants correct for voicing, place of articulation, and manner of articulation; or percentage of occurrence for phonological processes. However, the children exhibited different patterns of production across the two languages and showed different patterns compared to monolingual children of either language.

Clinical Implications: The preliminary findings suggest that the phonological system of bilingual (Spanish-English) children is both similar to and different from that of monolingual speakers of either language. Compared to monolingual speakers, bilingual children should be expected to exhibit different types of errors and different substitution patterns for target sounds.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported in part by National Institutes of Deafness & Other Communication Disorders Contract N01-DC-8-2100. The authors wish to thank the parents and children of the Camden City School District; Dr. John Boyle and staff at the Early Childhood Development Center; and Dr. Gloria Mitchell, Ms. Louise Lawson, Ms. Migdalia Polo, and the teachers of RESPOND. We also wish to thank Amy Parache for her help in data entry, Kim Oller and Rafael Delgado for their assistance in configuring the Logical International Phonetics Program, and Aquiles Iglesias for his insightful comments on an earlier draft of the manuscript. Finally, thanks to Elaine Silliman, Kenn Apel, and three anonymous reviewers for their constructive feedback.
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