Grammatical Deviations in the Spoken and Written Language of Hebrew-Speaking Children With Hearing Impairments Purpose: The present study reports a detailed analysis of written and spoken language samples of Hebrew-speaking children aged 11–13 years who are deaf. It focuses on the description of various grammatical deviations in the two modalities. Method: Participants were 13 students with hearing impairments (HI) attending special classrooms integrated into ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2001
Grammatical Deviations in the Spoken and Written Language of Hebrew-Speaking Children With Hearing Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hana Tur-Kaspa, PhD
    Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Esther Dromi
    Tel Aviv University, Israel University of Texas at Dallas
  • Contact author: Hana Tur-Kaspa, PhD, School of Education, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel, 69978.
    Contact author: Hana Tur-Kaspa, PhD, School of Education, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv, Israel, 69978.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: chani@post.tau.ac.il
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2001
Grammatical Deviations in the Spoken and Written Language of Hebrew-Speaking Children With Hearing Impairments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2001, Vol. 32, 79-89. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/007)
History: Received February 24, 2000 , Accepted September 27, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2001, Vol. 32, 79-89. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/007)
History: Received February 24, 2000; Accepted September 27, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

Purpose: The present study reports a detailed analysis of written and spoken language samples of Hebrew-speaking children aged 11–13 years who are deaf. It focuses on the description of various grammatical deviations in the two modalities.

Method: Participants were 13 students with hearing impairments (HI) attending special classrooms integrated into two elementary schools in Tel Aviv, Israel, and 9 students with normal hearing (NH) in regular classes in these same schools. Spoken and written language samples were collected from all participants using the same five preplanned elicitation probes.

Results: Students with HI were found to display significantly more grammatical deviations than their NH peers in both their spoken and written language samples. Most importantly, between-modality differences were noted. The participants with HI exhibited significantly more grammatical deviations in their written language samples than in their spoken samples. However, the distribution of grammatical deviations across categories was similar in the two modalities. The most common grammatical deviations in order of their frequency were failure to supply obligatory morphological markers, failure to mark grammatical agreement, and the omission of a major syntactic constituent in a sentence. Word order violations were rarely recorded in the Hebrew samples.

Clinical Implications: Performance differences in the two modalities encourage clinicians and teachers to facilitate target linguistic forms in diverse communication contexts. Furthermore, the identification of linguistic targets for intervention must be based on the unique grammatical structure of the target language.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We extend our gratitude to Talila Gilad for her assistance in the data collection and to Dee B. Ankonina for her editorial contribution.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access