Literate Language Features in Spoken Narratives of Children With Typical Language and Children With Language Impairments Purpose: This study focused on literate language features in spoken narratives of school-age children with typical language development and school-age children with language impairments (LI). Method: The spoken narrative retellings from male and female children aged 7 to 10 years were analyzed. The samples yielded scores for the literate language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2001
Literate Language Features in Spoken Narratives of Children With Typical Language and Children With Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kellie S. Greenhalgh
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Carol J. Strong
    Utah State University, Logan
    Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, 2800 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322
  • Contact author: Carol J. Strong, Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, 2800 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322.
    Contact author: Carol J. Strong, Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, 2800 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: carols@coe.usu.edu
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2001
Literate Language Features in Spoken Narratives of Children With Typical Language and Children With Language Impairments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2001, Vol. 32, 114-125. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/010)
History: Received July 24, 2000 , Accepted January 10, 2001
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2001, Vol. 32, 114-125. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/010)
History: Received July 24, 2000; Accepted January 10, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 59

Purpose: This study focused on literate language features in spoken narratives of school-age children with typical language development and school-age children with language impairments (LI).

Method: The spoken narrative retellings from male and female children aged 7 to 10 years were analyzed. The samples yielded scores for the literate language features of conjunctions, elaborated noun phrases, mental and linguistic verbs, and adverbs. A general language performance measure (number of different words) also was studied.

Results: Group membership main effects were statistically significant for conjunctions and elaborated noun phrases, with effect sizes ranging from small to moderate. No statistically significant differences were obtained for age level or gender. Correlations between scores for number of different words and scores for the literate language features were low to moderate.

Clinical Implications: The measures of conjunctions and elaborated noun phrases differentiated children with LI from those with typical language. When the number of different words was normalized for sample length, support for its use as a general language performance measure was not obtained.

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