Social Behaviors of Children With Language Impairment on the Playground A Pilot Study Research Article
Research Article  |   April 2001
Social Behaviors of Children With Language Impairment on the Playground
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin Fujiki, PhD
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
    Brigham Young University, Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602-1241
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Ted Isaacson
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Connie Summers
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Martin Fujiki, PhD, Brigham Young University, Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602-1241.
    Contact author: Martin Fujiki, PhD, Brigham Young University, Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, 130 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602-1241.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Martin_Fujiki@byu.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 2001
Social Behaviors of Children With Language Impairment on the Playground
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2001, Vol. 32, 101-113. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/008)
History: Received July 12, 2000 , Accepted December 10, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2001, Vol. 32, 101-113. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/008)
History: Received July 12, 2000; Accepted December 10, 2000

Purpose: This pilot study examined the social behaviors of children with language impairment (LI) and their typical peers on the playground.

Method: Eight children with LI and their age-matched peers were videotape recorded for 45 minutes during morning and lunch recesses. Samples were divided into 5-second segments and coded according to the child’s behavior occurring during the segment. The behavior displayed during each interval was then coded into one of 37 subcategories. These subcategories were grouped into six general categories of (a) peer interaction, (b) adult interaction, (c) withdrawal, (d) aggression, (e) victimization, and (f) other.

Results: Significant differences were observed in the categories of peer interaction and withdrawal. Typical children spent significantly more time interacting with peers than did children with LI. Conversely, children with LI demonstrated significantly more withdrawn behaviors than did their typical peers. Analyses of effect size using ω2 indicated that group membership accounted for approximately 30% of the variability in both of these types of playground behavior. No other significant differences were observed. These findings support the conclusions of researchers using teacher interview procedures, indicating that children with LI are more withdrawn than their typical peers at school.

Clinical Implications: Specific intervention targeting social language skills in playground contexts may be warranted to include children with LI in social interactions at recess.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported, in part, by a research grant from the David O. McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. We would like to thank Janet Howe, Bridget Feighan, and Lee Robinson for their assistance in participant identification and project coordination. We also would like to acknowledge and thank JoLyn Carter, Yuet-King, Ho, Catherine Ballif, and Melissa Parry for their assistance in data collection and analysis. We also would like to thank Elaine Silliman, Patty Prelock, Pam Hadley, Anne van Kleeck, and an anonymous reviewer for their helpful comments in reviewing this manuscript.
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