Professional Skills for Serving Students Who Use AAC in General Education Classrooms A Team Perspective Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   January 01, 2001
Professional Skills for Serving Students Who Use AAC in General Education Classrooms
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gloria Soto
    San Francisco State University, CA
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132
  • Eve Müller
    University of California-Berkeley San Francisco State University
  • Pam Hunt
    San Francisco State University, CA
  • Lori Goetz
    San Francisco State University, CA
  • Contact author: Gloria Soto, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132.
    Contact author: Gloria Soto, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: gsoto@sfsu.edu
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   January 01, 2001
Professional Skills for Serving Students Who Use AAC in General Education Classrooms
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2001, Vol. 32, 51-56. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/005)
History: Received March 28, 2000 , Accepted June 20, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2001, Vol. 32, 51-56. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/005)
History: Received March 28, 2000; Accepted June 20, 2000

The roles of school-based professionals serving students with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) needs are changing in light of the inclusion movement. Focus group research methodology was used to investigate professional skills regarded by educational team members as necessary to support students who used AAC in general education classrooms. Educational teams consisted of speech-language pathologists, classroom teachers, inclusion support teachers, instructional assistants, and parents. All valued the ability to work collaboratively, provide access to the core curriculum, cultivate social supports, maintain and operate the AAC system, and create classroom structures to educate heterogeneous groups of students. Implications are discussed for AAC service delivery and the professional preparation of speech-language pathologists serving as members of AAC teams in inclusive classrooms.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The authors would like to thank the parents, teachers, speech-language pathologists and instructional assistants who participated in our focus group discussions. This research was supported in part by U.S. Department of Education Grant No. H324C980087. The content and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and no official endorsement should be inferred.
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