Current Policies and New Directions for Speech-Language Pathology Assistants This article provides an overview of current American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) policies for the appropriate use and supervision of speech-language pathology assistants with an emphasis on the need to preserve the role of fully qualified speech-language pathologists in the service delivery system. Seven challenging issues surrounding the appropriate use of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2001
Current Policies and New Directions for Speech-Language Pathology Assistants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Paul-Brown, PhD
    American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Rockville, MD
    Director
  • Lynette R. Goldberg
    George Washington University, Washington, DC
  • Contact author: Diane Paul-Brown, PhD, Director, Clinical Issues in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language- Hearing Association, 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852.
    Contact author: Diane Paul-Brown, PhD, Director, Clinical Issues in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language- Hearing Association, 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: dpaulbrown@asha.org
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2001
Current Policies and New Directions for Speech-Language Pathology Assistants
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2001, Vol. 32, 4-17. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/001)
History: Received November 1, 1999 , Accepted June 28, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2001, Vol. 32, 4-17. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2001/001)
History: Received November 1, 1999; Accepted June 28, 2000

This article provides an overview of current American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) policies for the appropriate use and supervision of speech-language pathology assistants with an emphasis on the need to preserve the role of fully qualified speech-language pathologists in the service delivery system. Seven challenging issues surrounding the appropriate use of speech-language pathology assistants are considered. These include registering assistants and approving training programs; membership in ASHA; discrepancies between state requirements and ASHA policies; preparation for serving diverse multicultural, bilingual, and international populations; supervision considerations; funding and reimbursement for assistants; and perspectives on career-ladder/bachelor-level personnel. The formation of a National Leadership Council is proposed to develop a coordinated strategic plan for addressing these controversial and potentially divisive issues related to speech-language pathology assistants. This council would implement strategies for future development in the areas of professional education pertaining to assistant-level supervision, instruction of assistants, communication networks, policy development, research, and the dissemination/promotion of information regarding assistants.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The authors wish to thank Carolyn Stancliff and Carol Caperton for their assistance with the preparation of this article.
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