From the Editor… Ruth Huntley Bahr As the new editor of LSHSS, my challenge is to maintain the quality of information that is transmitted through this journal. As such, I would like to encourage readers—researchers and clinicians alike—to submit contributions that expand our knowledge base about treatment efficacy. All of us agree ... Editorial
Editorial  |   January 01, 2001
From the Editor…
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   January 01, 2001
From the Editor…
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2001, Vol. 32, 3. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3201.03
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2001, Vol. 32, 3. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3201.03
Ruth Huntley Bahr
As the new editor of LSHSS, my challenge is to maintain the quality of information that is transmitted through this journal. As such, I would like to encourage readers—researchers and clinicians alike—to submit contributions that expand our knowledge base about treatment efficacy. All of us agree that we need to be using treatment techniques that are based in scientific findings. The problem arises when we actually look at the state of our efficacy findings on treatment outcomes. There is still so much more that we need to know.
A major issue concerns the type of evidence necessary to determine if a treatment technique is a good one. Researcher and clinician preferences for evidence are frequently divided. This dilemma was discussed in a recent Research to Practice section of LSHSS (see Apel, 1999  and Kamhi, 1999). In these papers, Kamhi and Apel discussed the relevance of the idea that a treatment technique is valid because, in a clinician’s professional judgment, it benefits his or her client. Although clinicians may be willing to settle for improved performance on tasks and assessment measures as evidence of treatment efficacy, scientists systematically test hypotheses in order to determine if a particular technique is valid. Neither approach is perfect, and the solution may reside in increased communication between the researcher and the practitioner to facilitate the development of good research questions. Clinicians can describe the realities of daily intervention in the context of their working conditions so that researchers can devise more relevant treatment-oriented studies. LSHSS is an appropriate forum for this type of communication to occur. LSHSS offers several formats in which this information on treatment efficacy can be presented (all of these are defined further in the Information for Authors section of this journal).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access