Classroom Amplification Technology Theory and Practice Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 2000
Classroom Amplification Technology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph J. Smaldino
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
  • Carl C. Crandell
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: Joseph.Smaldino@uni.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum: Improving Acoustics in American Schools
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 2000
Classroom Amplification Technology
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2000, Vol. 31, 371-375. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3104.371
History: Received September 27, 1999 , Accepted June 30, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2000, Vol. 31, 371-375. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3104.371
History: Received September 27, 1999; Accepted June 30, 2000

Many children are struggling to listen and learn in noisy and reverberant classrooms. Some of these children have hearing loss; others have essentially normal hearing but are at risk for accurate speech perception. Hearing aid fitting protocols and technology can be effective for children with hearing loss, but the aids must be selected and adjusted for classroom environments. For many children, personal amplification may not provide enough benefit for listening and learning to occur. For children who require more than a hearing aid and for at-risk children who have difficulty separating the teacher's message from background noise, technology that is specifically designed to improve the classroom signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may be required. In addition to the use of technology, children must learn to listen effectively in order for a meaningful signal to be received and used.

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