Acoustical Barriers to Learning Children at Risk in Every Classroom Clinical Forum: Improving Acoustics in American Schools
Clinical Forum: Improving Acoustics in American Schools  |   October 2000
Acoustical Barriers to Learning
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: nelso477@tc.umn.edu
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum: Improving Acoustics in American Schools   |   October 2000
Acoustical Barriers to Learning
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2000, Vol. 31, 356-361. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3104.356
History: Received September 27, 1999 , Accepted June 30, 2000
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2000, Vol. 31, 356-361. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3104.356
History: Received September 27, 1999; Accepted June 30, 2000

There are surprisingly large numbers of children with various auditory disorders in the schools. Their classrooms are often noisy, reverberant, and active places of learning. For these children, their auditory problems plus the poor classroom acoustics cause significant learning problems. Poor listening conditions can affect all children, but they affect those with auditory disorders more. Improving classroom acoustics can significantly reduce the negative educational impact of auditory disorders. This article reviews relevant literature on acoustical barriers to successful learning and provides guidance for school personnel making decisions regarding classroom facilities.

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