The Hearing Aid Effect in African American and Caucasian Males as Perceived by Female Judges of the Same Race Prior studies have proven the existence of the "hearing aid effect" when photographs of Caucasian males and females wearing a body aid, a post-auricular aid (behind-the-ear), or no hearing aid were judged by lay persons and professionals. This study was performed to determine if African American and Caucasian males, judged ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1999
The Hearing Aid Effect in African American and Caucasian Males as Perceived by Female Judges of the Same Race
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Davis
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Williams and Brice School of Nursing Building, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, Columbia
  • Rhonda Jackson
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Williams and Brice School of Nursing Building, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, Columbia
  • Tina Smith
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Williams and Brice School of Nursing Building, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, Columbia
  • William Cooper
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Williams and Brice School of Nursing Building, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, Columbia
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tsmith@sophe.sph.sc.edu
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1999
The Hearing Aid Effect in African American and Caucasian Males as Perceived by Female Judges of the Same Race
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1999, Vol. 30, 165-172. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3002.165
History: Received September 25, 1997 , Accepted August 20, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1999, Vol. 30, 165-172. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3002.165
History: Received September 25, 1997; Accepted August 20, 1998

Prior studies have proven the existence of the "hearing aid effect" when photographs of Caucasian males and females wearing a body aid, a post-auricular aid (behind-the-ear), or no hearing aid were judged by lay persons and professionals. This study was performed to determine if African American and Caucasian males, judged by female members of their own race, were likely to be judged in a similar manner on the basis of appearance, personality, assertiveness, and achievement. Sixty female undergraduate education majors (30 African American; 30 Caucasian) used a semantic differential scale to rate slides of preteen African American and Caucasian males, with and without hearing aids. The results of this study showed that female African American and Caucasian judges rated males of their respective races differently. The hearing aid effect was predominant among the Caucasian judges across the dimensions of appearance, personality, assertiveness, and achievement. In contrast, the African American judges only exhibited a hearing aid effect on the appearance dimension.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to thank Alan Montgomery for his expert advice on this project regarding the statistical analysis. This study was based on a master’s thesis completed in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at the University of South Carolina by the first two authors.
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