Language Testing in Adolescents With Brain Injury A Consideration of the CELF-3 Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   April 01, 1999
Language Testing in Adolescents With Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lyn S. Turkstra
    University of Arizona, Tucson, Department of Communication Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: lst2@po.cwru.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   April 01, 1999
Language Testing in Adolescents With Brain Injury
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1999, Vol. 30, 132-140. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3002.132
History: Received August 26, 1997 , Accepted May 8, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1999, Vol. 30, 132-140. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3002.132
History: Received August 26, 1997; Accepted May 8, 1998

The validity of the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Third Edition (CELF-3, Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 1995) for the identification and description of language disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI) was considered in 11 adolescents with TBI. In general, the CELF-3 identified only the individuals who had previously been diagnosed as language impaired, not the individuals with verbal information processing impairments but no diagnosis of language impairment. The test did not permit the identification of strengths and weaknesses.

Intercorrelations among subtest standard scores were as high in the TBI group as in the standardization sample, which is consistent with the CELF-3 being a one-factor test. Test performance may have been influenced by the interaction of the subjects’ memory abilities and the subtests’ memory demands, although this relationship was not statistically significant in the present data.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported in part by a small grant from the Office of the Vice President for Research at the University of Arizona to the author. The author wishes to thank Erwin B. Montgomery, Jr. for his statistical assistance, and the following clinicians for their contribution to the rankings: Pelagie Beeson, Yvon Blais, Lila Carson, Marianne Casey, Pamela Dengos, Kristine Edahl, Linda Foskey, Maureen Johnston, Kathy Kennedy, Patricia McMahon, Elizabeth Mercer, Heather Miller, and Denise Simon.
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