To Use or Not to Use Factors That Influence the Selection of New Treatment Approaches Research to Practice
Research to Practice  |   January 01, 1999
To Use or Not to Use
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    University of Memphis, Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: akamhi@cc.memphis.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research to Practice
Research to Practice   |   January 01, 1999
To Use or Not to Use
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 92-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.92
History: Received April 16, 1998 , Accepted August 28, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 92-98. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.92
History: Received April 16, 1998; Accepted August 28, 1998

Clinicians are often faced with decisions concerning whether to use a new or different treatment approach. What factors influence these decisions? Are clinicians more influenced by treatment efficacy studies or their own theoretical biases? What role do parents and families play in influencing these decisions? Why are scientists so skeptical of new treatment approaches? When should a clinician try out a new or different treatment approach? Should clinicians be trusted to use the best treatment approaches? These are the central questions addressed in this article.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
I would like to thank Kenn Apel, Mike Casby, and Elaine Silliman for their helpful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript.
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