Classroom-Based Assessment of a Collaborative Intervention Program With Kindergarten and First-Grade Students The Maximizing Academic Growth by Improving Communication (MAGIC) comprehensive classroom teacher and speech-language pathologist collaborative intervention program was developed and initially implemented in 12 kindergarten and first-grade classes to determine whether children receiving this language-enriched program performed significantly better than control peers on a curriculum-based test and on teacher reports ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   January 01, 1999
Classroom-Based Assessment of a Collaborative Intervention Program With Kindergarten and First-Grade Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith G. Farber
    Juv-Ed, Inc., 21 Glenn Circle, Erdenheim, PA 19038
  • Evelyn R. Klein
    Temple University Center for Research in Human Development and Education, Philadelphia, PA
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: jfarber@juved.com
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange   |   January 01, 1999
Classroom-Based Assessment of a Collaborative Intervention Program With Kindergarten and First-Grade Students
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 83-91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.83
History: Received April 23, 1996 , Accepted June 30, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 83-91. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.83
History: Received April 23, 1996; Accepted June 30, 1998

The Maximizing Academic Growth by Improving Communication (MAGIC) comprehensive classroom teacher and speech-language pathologist collaborative intervention program was developed and initially implemented in 12 kindergarten and first-grade classes to determine whether children receiving this language-enriched program performed significantly better than control peers on a curriculum-based test and on teacher reports of classroom communication. Results indicated that weekly classroom intervention resulted in significantly higher scores on the subtests of listening and writing for the children involved in the MAGIC program. Students in the treatment groups demonstrated significantly higher abilities in understanding vocabulary and cognitive-linguistic concepts in addition to increased writing skill development for producing relevant sentences with correct mechanics and spelling.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was funded in part by a grant award from the U.S Department of Education, Federal Grant #S201A20007.
Our thanks are extended to Thomas A. Hutchinson for his invaluable suggestions with the editing of this manuscript. Thanks also to Wayne A. Secord and Nancy A. Creaghead for their thorough review and assistance with this manuscript.
The authors wish to acknowledge and thank Judith Boyd, Beverly Cohen, Barbara Cutler, Susan Cutler, Ruth Furman, Marilyn Goldstein, Monica Goss, Bonny Hohenberger, Earl Levit, Sonia Loigman, Patricia Mueller, Lillian Ponzo, Vicki Pressley, Shirley Silverman, Linda Weiner, and Arleen Weinstein, who are the members of the MAGIC committee, for their dedication and involvement with this project. We also extend our appreciation to the Offices of Categorical Programs and Assessment of the School District of Philadelphia, and Drexel University, Division of Psychology for assistance with this program.
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