Computer-Based Language Assessment Software The Effects of Presentation and Response Format Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1999
Computer-Based Language Assessment Software
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert Haaf
    Fanshawe College, 204 Renfro Crescent, London, Ontario, Canada N5Z 3B7
  • Brent Duncan
    Thames Valley Children’s Centre, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle
    University of Western Ontario, Canada
  • Maria Carew
    University of Western Ontario, Canada
  • Paula Kapitan
    University of Western Ontario, Canada
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rhaaf@julian.uwo.ca
Article Information
Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1999
Computer-Based Language Assessment Software
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 68-74. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.68
History: Received July 10, 1997 , Accepted June 26, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 68-74. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.68
History: Received July 10, 1997; Accepted June 26, 1998

Nonstandard presentation and response formats are often employed by speech-language pathologists when clients are unable to perform the pointing response required of many standardized tests. However, any adaptation to test administration potentially compromises the norming standards of that test. The present study investigated the effects of computerized presentation of the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R, Dunn & Dunn, 1981) Form M, using two computer-based response formats. Seventy-two normally developing children between the ages of 4:0 (years:months) and 8:11 participated in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three response conditions: (1) standard presentation -direct pointing, (2) computer presentation-trackball, and (3) computer presentation-automated scanning. Statistical analyses revealed that there were no differences in performance across the response conditions, which is consistent with the hypothesis that computerized testforms are equivalent to standard forms. Age was strongly related to increased accuracy regardless of condition. Thus, the adapted response formats of the computerized version constitute statistically equivalent forms of the PPVT-R and can be used with the published norms for this test.

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