The Influence of Language/Cognitive Profile on Discourse Intervention Outcome Children with communication needs are often allocated intervention services as a result of the relationship between their cognitive ability and language performance. Children with higher cognitive skills relative to language skills are considered promising candidates for language services. In contrast, children who are delayed in both cognitive and language abilities ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1999
The Influence of Language/Cognitive Profile on Discourse Intervention Outcome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kevin N. Cole
    Washington Research Institute, 150 Nickerson Street, Suite 305, Seattle, WA 98109
  • Truman E. Coggins
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Cheryl Vanderstoep
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: kcole@wriedu.org
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1999
The Influence of Language/Cognitive Profile on Discourse Intervention Outcome
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 61-67. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.61
History: Received February 10, 1997 , Accepted May 18, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 61-67. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.61
History: Received February 10, 1997; Accepted May 18, 1998

Children with communication needs are often allocated intervention services as a result of the relationship between their cognitive ability and language performance. Children with higher cognitive skills relative to language skills are considered promising candidates for language services. In contrast, children who are delayed in both cognitive and language abilities are considered poor candidates for intervention and are often excluded from services, or given a lower priority for services. This study examines the effects of intervention on one aspect of pragmatic development (discourse skills) following intervention for two groups of young children with delayed language development: one group with measured cognitive performance above language performance, and the other group with similar delays in both language and cognitive performance. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated significant differences between groups for two of 15 measures derived from language samples. Both favored the children with equivalent delays in language and cognition. These findings do not support the notion that children with equivalent delays in cognition and language development are poor candidates for language intervention. Service delivery and policy implications are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This research was supported by a grant from the Washington Association for Retarded Citizens Trust Fund Board. Points of view or opinions stated in this report do not necessarily represent official agency positions.
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