Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Talking With Peers and Teachers Adolescents’ Opinions Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1999
Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Talking With Peers and Teachers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vicki A. Reed
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Cumberland Campus, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW, 1825, Australia
  • Karen McLeod
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Cumberland Campus, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW, 1825, Australia
  • Lindy McAllister
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Cumberland Campus, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW, 1825, Australia
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: V.Reed@cchs.usyd.edu.au
  • Currently affiliated with Cowra District Hospital, Cowra, NSW, Australia
    Currently affiliated with Cowra District Hospital, Cowra, NSW, Australia×
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1999
Importance of Selected Communication Skills for Talking With Peers and Teachers
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 32-49. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.32
History: Received April 21, 1997 , Accepted March 28, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 32-49. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.32
History: Received April 21, 1997; Accepted March 28, 1998

This research explored normally achieving 10th-grade adolescents’ opinions concerning the relative importance of 14 communication skills for their own communication when talking with their teachers and when talking with their peers. It also investigated if the adolescents’ gender influenced their opinions. Results indicated that the adolescents tended to perceive skillsassociated with characteristics of empathy and considered to be addressee-focused as relatively more important for their communication with their peers. When the adolescents considered their communication with teachers, communication skills related to discoursemanagement strategies assumed relatively more importance. Although gender appeared to influence the types of communication skills considered to be more important than others, gender-based differences in the relative importance of the communication skills were less apparent when gender and communication partnerdifferences were considered together. Future research directions and clinical implications are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was based on an honor’s thesis that was completed by the second author in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at The University of Sydney. Portions of the study were presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association of Speech and Hearing in May 1994 and the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in December 1995.
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