Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children An Update for the 1990s Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1999
Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kris English
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Duquesne University, 403 Fisher Hall, Pittsburgh, PA, 15282
  • Gerald Church
    Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: english@duq.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1999
Unilateral Hearing Loss in Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 26-31. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.26
History: Received July 25, 1997 , Accepted March 10, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1999, Vol. 30, 26-31. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3001.26
History: Received July 25, 1997; Accepted March 10, 1998

In the 1980s, two studies found that children with unilateral hearing impairment were 10 times more likely to repeat a grade compared to the general school-age population. Since the publication of those reports, grade retention has been found to be an ineffective strategy for achieving long-term academic success, and is no longer widely recommended. This survey describeshow children with unilateral hearing loss are presently supported given this change in educational practices. Reports on 406 children indicated that 54% received individualized special education services, in addition to some level of audiologic support, and that 24% were functioning below average relative to their peers. Other information regarding demographics, use of amplification, and additional educational concerns are also reported.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This survey would not have been possible without the help of the following educational audiologists, who provided the data for this project: Mary Bowes, Jane Broghammer, Barbara Doedel, Linda Erb, Todd Ericksen, Mary Fran Fettinger, Robin Gaschler, Roxanne Hanel, Claudia Hawley, Carolyn Horton, Nancy Jacobs, Betty Jane James, Laurie Langan, Sue LeLevier, Barbara Murphy, Martha Mundy, Kathy Pudup, Patti Reichle, Gail Gegg Rosenberg, Colette Sampson, Michele Schmidt, Marlys Vonhof, Patti Weathers, Pat Wissman, Bob Wyatt, and Michael Zagarella. The authors sincerely thank these colleagues for their contributions.
Information regarding the Educational Audiology Association can be obtained by calling 800-460-7322.
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