Meeting the Critical Shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists to Serve the Public Schools—Collaborative Rewards This article presents a collaborative approach to providing graduate education to speech-language pathologists who are employed in public school districts. A partnership called the Central Florida Speech-Language Consortium was established among the University of Central Florida, 10 Central Florida school districts, and community agencies to address the issue of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Meeting the Critical Shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists to Serve the Public Schools—Collaborative Rewards
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda I. Rosa-Lugo
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Elizabeth A. Rivera
    Orange County Public School District, Orlando, FL
  • Susan W. McKeown
    Brevard County Public School District, Viera, FL
  • Contact author: Linda I. Rosa-Lugo, EdD, University of Central Florida, Department of Communicative Disorders, 12424 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32826-2215.
    Contact author: Linda I. Rosa-Lugo, EdD, University of Central Florida, Department of Communicative Disorders, 12424 Research Parkway, Suite 200, Orlando, FL 32826-2215.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Meeting the Critical Shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists to Serve the Public Schools—Collaborative Rewards
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1998, Vol. 29, 232-242. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2904.232
History: Received September 4, 1997 , Accepted April 28, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1998, Vol. 29, 232-242. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2904.232
History: Received September 4, 1997; Accepted April 28, 1998

This article presents a collaborative approach to providing graduate education to speech-language pathologists who are employed in public school districts. A partnership called the Central Florida Speech-Language Consortium was established among the University of Central Florida, 10 Central Florida school districts, and community agencies to address the issue of the critical shortage of speech-language pathologists in the public schools. The consortium program provided bachelor-level speech-language pathologists in the public schools the opportunity to obtain a master’s degree while they continued to work in the schools.

Key innovations of the program included: (a) additional graduate slots for public school employees; (b) modifications in the location and time of university courses, as well as practica opportunities in the schools; and (c) the participation and support of public school administrators in facilitating supervision and practicum experiences for the consortium participants. The consortium program resulted in an increase in the number of master’s level and culturally and linguistically diverse speech-language pathologists available for employment in the public schools of Central Florida. Recommendations for facilitating future endeavors are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The authors wish to acknowledge the pioneers of the consortium initiative, with special recognition to Rhonda S. Work, Florida Department of Education, University of Central Florida, College of Health and Public Affairs administrators and faculty, and the public school district speech-language program administrators that make up the “Central Florida Consortium.”
The authors would like to express their gratitude to the graduate teaching assistants who helped in the daily operations of the program: Elon Booth, Jennifer Grelotti, Kathleen Steil-Brecht, Tracy Chasey, and Carla Conover. Sincere appreciation is also expressed to Sabrina Andrews, Assistant Director of UCF’s Office of Institutional Research, for her assistance in data collection and interpretation, and to Janice Thompson and Kenyatta O. Rivers for proofreading and editing of the manuscript.
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