Stickwriting Stories A Quick and Easy Narrative Representation Strategy Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1998
Stickwriting Stories
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa A. Ukrainetz
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Contact author: Teresa Ukrainetz, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, P.O. Box 3311, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 8207-3311.
    Contact author: Teresa Ukrainetz, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, P.O. Box 3311, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 8207-3311.×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1998
Stickwriting Stories
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1998, Vol. 29, 197-206. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2904.197
History: Received February 20, 1998 , Accepted March 31, 1998
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1998, Vol. 29, 197-206. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2904.197
History: Received February 20, 1998; Accepted March 31, 1998

Narrative is an important target of language intervention. However, oral narratives are difficult to remember, review, and revise because of their length and complexity. Writing is an option, but is often frustrating for both student and clinician. This article introduces a notational system called pictography that can be useful for temporarily preserving story content. Children represent the characters, settings, and sequences of actions with simple, chronologically or episodically organized stick-figure drawings. As a quick and easy representational strategy, pictography is applicable to both individual language intervention and inclusive classroom settings. This article describes benefits observed in narrative intervention, including facilitation of a time sequence, increased length and quality, and a greater focus on narrative content rather than on the mechanics of writing.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This work was partially supported by the 1993 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Foundation Student Research Award in Child Language and a doctoral fellowship from the Social Sciences and Research Council of Canada.
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