A Clinical Synthesis of the "Late Talker" Literature Implications for Service Delivery Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1998
A Clinical Synthesis of the "Late Talker" Literature
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna J. Kelly, PhD
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI, 53233
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1998
A Clinical Synthesis of the "Late Talker" Literature
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1998, Vol. 29, 76-84. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2902.76
History: Received August 26, 1997 , Accepted October 26, 1997
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1998, Vol. 29, 76-84. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2902.76
History: Received August 26, 1997; Accepted October 26, 1997

"Late talkers" are most often differentiated from their normally developing peers by their limited expressive lexicons. In the majority of the studies conducted on late talkers, these children are described as producing fewer than 50 words and/or producing limited word combinations by 24 months of age. The expressive language of some of the late talkers will eventually resemble their same-age peers; however, a substantial number of these children will continue to evidence difficulties with their expressive language acquisition. This article provides a review of the literature on late talkers in order to assist speech-language pathologists as they tackle those issues that are specific to service provision with this population of children.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I wish to acknowledge the assistance of three individuals, Patricia Duffy Dabrowski, Paula Pecyna Rhyner, and Ruth V. Watkins, for their helpful feedback on a presubmission draft of the manuscript.
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