The Use of SCAN to Identify Children at Risk for CAPD Response to Keith (1998) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1998
The Use of SCAN to Identify Children at Risk for CAPD
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria F. Emerson
    Spokane Public Schools, Spokane, WA
  • Kami K. Crandall
    Spokane Ear Nose and Throat Clinic, Spokane, WA
  • J. Anthony Seikel
    Washington State University, Spokane
  • Gail D. Chermak
    Washington State University, Spokane
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1998
The Use of SCAN to Identify Children at Risk for CAPD
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1998, Vol. 29, 118-119. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2902.118
History: Received July 8, 1997 , Accepted November 20, 1997
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1998, Vol. 29, 118-119. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2902.118
History: Received July 8, 1997; Accepted November 20, 1997
We wish to reply to Keith’s thoughtful comments concerning our interpretation of SCAN results, as reported in our article (Emerson, Crandall, Seikel, & Chermak, 1997). We agree that retrospective studies such as we reported of early otitis media (OM) render the interpretation of auditory and language scores difficult. The literature is fairly discursive on the long-term effects of OM, although as we stated, the relationship between OM and central auditory processing (CAP) is notably less equivocal (Besing & Koehnke, 1995; Feagans, Sanyal, Henderson, Collier, & Applebaum, 1987; Gravel & Wallace, 1992; Gunnarson & Finitzo, 1991; Hall, Grose, & Pillsbury, 1995; Jerger, Jerger, Alford, & Abrams, 1983). Based on this literature, we expected that if these OM subjects were to show deficits at this age, it would more likely be in CAP (as revealed by SCAN performance deficits) than on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R). Again, we emphasize if, because we agree that measuring performance some 4 years after the OM episodes leaves much room for the resolution of short-term impact, allows intervening variables to exert effects, and otherwise renders results that are somewhat suspect. Indeed, we did not intend to “tacitly suggest” that we “expected to find that children with depressed PPVT-R scores would be the same group of children who failed the screening criteria of 1 SD below the mean on SCAN.” Rather than the co-occurrence of depressed PPVT-R and SCAN performance, we were suggesting that we would not be surprised to see depressed SCAN in the OM group, with or without depressed PPVT-R scores. Finding a significant difference between the two groups on the PPVT-R, but not for the SCAN, was somewhat surprising.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access