Educational Considerations for At-Risk/Marginal Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing The teaching of children who are at risk, marginally deaf, or hard of hearing is considered in this article, primarily from the framework provided by Ogbu (1990), Sinclair and Ghory (1990), Cromer (1993), and the contemporary writings of others working with multiethnic populations of children who are hearing and hearing-impaired. ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1997
Educational Considerations for At-Risk/Marginal Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert E. Kretschmer, PhD
    Teachers College, Columbia University, New York
  • Contact author: Robert E. Kretschmer, PhD, Department of Health and Behavior Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027.
    Contact author: Robert E. Kretschmer, PhD, Department of Health and Behavior Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rek16@Columbia.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum: Educational Considerations for Children With Hearing Loss
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1997
Educational Considerations for At-Risk/Marginal Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1997, Vol. 28, 395-406. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2804.395
History: Received July 20, 1994 , Accepted October 28, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1997, Vol. 28, 395-406. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2804.395
History: Received July 20, 1994; Accepted October 28, 1996

The teaching of children who are at risk, marginally deaf, or hard of hearing is considered in this article, primarily from the framework provided by Ogbu (1990), Sinclair and Ghory (1990), Cromer (1993), and the contemporary writings of others working with multiethnic populations of children who are hearing and hearing-impaired. Emphasis is put on the social constructive nature of this complex phenomenon, the heterogeneity (both inter- and intraculturally) of the populations involved, and some of the processes that students go through in becoming marginalized. Finally, consideration is given to how one might address some of the problems of educating these children. Descriptions and examples of some successful intervention projects are presented.

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