Issues in the Development of School and Interpersonal Discourse for Children Who Have Hearing Loss English instruction for children with haring loss has traditionally focused on teaching about language conventions, with much less attention to learning language, or to learning through language—especially its discourse features. The author argues that language intervention, through the collaborative efforts of speech-language pathologists and teachers, should promote communication interactions that ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1997
Issues in the Development of School and Interpersonal Discourse for Children Who Have Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard R. Kretschmer, Jr.
    University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Contact author: Richard R. Kretschmer, Jr., Division of Teacher Education, ML 002 — University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45220. Email: Richard.Kretschmer@uc.edu
    Contact author: Richard R. Kretschmer, Jr., Division of Teacher Education, ML 002 — University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45220. Email: Richard.Kretschmer@uc.edu×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Educational Considerations for Children With Hearing Loss
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1997
Issues in the Development of School and Interpersonal Discourse for Children Who Have Hearing Loss
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1997, Vol. 28, 374-383. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2804.374
History: Received April 29, 1994 , Accepted November 23, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1997, Vol. 28, 374-383. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2804.374
History: Received April 29, 1994; Accepted November 23, 1994

English instruction for children with haring loss has traditionally focused on teaching about language conventions, with much less attention to learning language, or to learning through language—especially its discourse features. The author argues that language intervention, through the collaborative efforts of speech-language pathologists and teachers, should promote communication interactions that emphasize English discourse that facilitates interpersonal and school language learning. Particular focus in this article is on issues of teacher talk, talk around print, self-talk in problem-solving, and the uses of narrative and descriptive discourse in interpersonal and school contexts.

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