Task Familiarity Effects on the Test Performance of Puerto Rican and African American Children Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1997
Task Familiarity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth D. Peña, PhD
    Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1089
  • Rosemary Quinn
    San Jose State University, San Jose, CA
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: LizP@mail.utexas.edu
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1997
Task Familiarity
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1997, Vol. 28, 323-332. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2804.323
History: Received December 11, 1995 , Accepted October 7, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1997, Vol. 28, 323-332. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2804.323
History: Received December 11, 1995; Accepted October 7, 1996

Two studies compared the performance of Puerto Rican and African American Head Start children on presumably familiar (description) and unfamiliar (one-word labeling) test tasks. Results indicated that children performed significantly better on the familiar test task, and that the familiar task was more sensitive in differentiating children who were typically developing from those with low language ability. Implications for the use of standardized tests, local norms, and dynamic assessment with culturally/linguistically diverse children are discussed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We gratefully acknowledge the cooperation and participation of the Head Start program administrators, teachers, and children at the various centers who provided us with valuable experiences and information. In addition, we acknowledge the contributions of our colleague, Brian Goldstein, and the following individuals for their help in collecting the data for these studies: Michele Aurignac, Maggie Campbell, Barbara Conboy, Carmen Cortes, Ellen Feldman, Maria Maunez, Pnina Siegler, Janet Quiñones, and Kristin Youngdahl. The first author also acknowledges the support and mentorship of her dissertation committee: Aquiles Iglesias, Rena Krakow, and Carol Lidz.
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