The Interactional Dimensions of Language Therapy This article distinguishes between adult- and child-centered intervention practices according to five interrelated dimensions of therapy context: the event, the agenda, the interactional lead, evaluation, and repair. To illustrate how these five dimensions could potentially manifest themselves during interaction, clinicians were asked to engage a child of their own choosing ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1997
The Interactional Dimensions of Language Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dana Kovarsky
    University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI
  • Judith F. Duchan
    State University of New York/Buffalo
  • Contact author: Dana Kovarsky, Department of Communicative Disorders, 2 Butterfield Road, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881. E-mail: dkovars@uriacc.uri.edu
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Clinical Forum: The Context of Language in the Schools
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1997
The Interactional Dimensions of Language Therapy
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 297-307. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.297
History: Received February 1, 1995 , Accepted October 3, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 297-307. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.297
History: Received February 1, 1995; Accepted October 3, 1996

This article distinguishes between adult- and child-centered intervention practices according to five interrelated dimensions of therapy context: the event, the agenda, the interactional lead, evaluation, and repair. To illustrate how these five dimensions could potentially manifest themselves during interaction, clinicians were asked to engage a child of their own choosing in both adult- and child-centered intervention.

The present discussion focuses on a turn-by-turn analysis of an excerpt from one of the child-centered language therapy sessions. Analysis reveals that simply doing away with three-part quiz question sequences, eliminating explicit verbal evaluations of a child's communicative performance, and changing the function of repair does not necessarily result in a more child-centered interaction. To evaluate the child-centeredness of intervention, one must understand the communicative relationships between speakers as they manifest themselves during ongoing sequences of interaction that are embedded in therapeutic events.

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