Communication Assessments of Individuals With Limited Hearing Communicative competence is not a matter of selecting a sentence and applying it to some use. Nor is competence a single dimension: It is a matter of interacting in socially coordinated ways with other people in some purposive behavior. Language fits a purpose and fits the people interacting. Assessment of ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1997
Communication Assessments of Individuals With Limited Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Madeline M. Maxwell
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Contact author: Madeline Maxwell, Department of Speech Communication, University of Texas at Austin, Austin. TX 78712-1089. E-mail: mmaxwell@utxvms.cc.utexas.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: The Context of Language in the Schools
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1997
Communication Assessments of Individuals With Limited Hearing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 231-244. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.231
History: Received October 17, 1994 , Accepted October 10, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 231-244. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.231
History: Received October 17, 1994; Accepted October 10, 1995

Communicative competence is not a matter of selecting a sentence and applying it to some use. Nor is competence a single dimension: It is a matter of interacting in socially coordinated ways with other people in some purposive behavior. Language fits a purpose and fits the people interacting. Assessment of the communication of children who are deaf has often resulted in frustrating lists of various kinds of linguistic elements, but little sense of how a child communicates. A better approach might focus on communicative competence.

This article presents a framework of assessment that has been derived from descriptive studies of the communication of individuals who are deaf. The frame-work attends to the shifting demands of the speaker and hearer roles in an interaction, the meanings that emerge from the interaction, and the action that ensues. The frame-work is followed up with some discussion of the organizational structures appropriate for comprehensive assessments and for ongoing teaching and therapy.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This paper owes much to graduate students in my classes at the University of Texas and, especially, to Molly Pearring-Carlos and Jeanne Doyle, who have participated in presentations of some of this material at conferences.
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