Hearing and Listening in a Typical Classroom In the past, many educational audiologists dedicated the majority of their time to assessing the hearing status of students and providing listening solutions to those students with hearing loss. More recently, educational audiologists are positioning themselves (rightfully) as experts not only in hearing loss, but also in the acoustical environment ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1997
Hearing and Listening in a Typical Classroom
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine V. Palmer, PhD
    University of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Catherine V. Palmer, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, 4033 Forbes Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.
    Contact author: Catherine V. Palmer, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, 4033 Forbes Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15260.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1997
Hearing and Listening in a Typical Classroom
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 213-218. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.213
History: Received November 21, 1995 , Accepted September 20, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 213-218. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.213
History: Received November 21, 1995; Accepted September 20, 1996

In the past, many educational audiologists dedicated the majority of their time to assessing the hearing status of students and providing listening solutions to those students with hearing loss. More recently, educational audiologists are positioning themselves (rightfully) as experts not only in hearing loss, but also in the acoustical environment for all students. In this role, audiologists are being called on to provide solutions for improving the listening environment in average classrooms that are full of students with normal hearing and with mild hearing impairment.

Although Flexer, Wray, and Ireland (1989) and Crandell, Smaldino, and Flexer (1995) have recently provided excellent reviews of classroom listening for the hearing professional, there is a need for a simple description of classroom listening for the educator, administrator, and parent. To assist local educational audiologists and classroom teachers in obtaining technology to enhance the classroom listening environment, the following article has been developed for use with administrators, school board members, and parents. The style is purposefully "chatty," and some terminology is simplified for the target audience.

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