Academic and Clinical Preparation and Practices of School Speech-Language Pathologists With People Who Stutter One-hundred-fifty-seven Indiana school speech-language pathologists responded to a survey regarding their educational and clinical preparation and their current clinical practices with people who stutter. Respondents described and evaluated the quantity and quality of their academic coursework and clinical experiences, as well as their current clinical procedures for diagnosing and treating ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1997
Academic and Clinical Preparation and Practices of School Speech-Language Pathologists With People Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen M. Kelly
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Jane S. Martin
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Kendra E. Baker
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Norma I. Rivera
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Jane E. Bishop
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Cindy B. Krizizke
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Deborah S. Stettler
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • June M. Stealy
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Ellen M. Kelly, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, 1353 Heavilon Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1353. E-mail: emkelly@purdue.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1997
Academic and Clinical Preparation and Practices of School Speech-Language Pathologists With People Who Stutter
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 195-212. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.195
History: Received September 19, 1995 , Accepted September 12, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1997, Vol. 28, 195-212. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2803.195
History: Received September 19, 1995; Accepted September 12, 1996

One-hundred-fifty-seven Indiana school speech-language pathologists responded to a survey regarding their educational and clinical preparation and their current clinical practices with people who stutter. Respondents described and evaluated the quantity and quality of their academic coursework and clinical experiences, as well as their current clinical procedures for diagnosing and treating stuttering. Speech-language pathologists also estimated their clinical competence with their clients who stutter at two junctures in their careers: (a) following completion of academic/clinical training, and (b) currently.

Respondents reported receiving insufficient academic and clinical preparation to work with people who stutter. In addition, nearly half of those surveyed reported that their current clinical skills are inadequate for managing stuttering. Findings are interpreted as confirming and extending the growing body of literature that documents the need for the improvement and expansion of educational and clinical opportunities in stuttering for speech-language pathologists in training and those in professional practice.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported, in part, by an Indiana Speech-Language-Hearing Association Research Grant and a Purdue University School of Liberal Arts Faculty Incentive Grant to the first author. Authors Baker, Rivera, and Bishop participated in this research in conjunction with the Purdue University School of Liberal Arts Dean’s Scholars Program.
Our thanks are extended to the five Lafayette and West Lafayette, IN school speech-language pathologists who participated in interviews to assist us with development of our survey. Thanks also to Peter Ramig, Associate Editor, and the two additional reviewers who provided thorough, facilitative reviews of this manuscript. Last, but not least, gratitude is extended to the Indiana school speech-language pathologists who took the time to complete and return our survey.
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