Clinicians’ Training and Confidence Associated With Treating School-Age Children Who Stutter A National Survey Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1997
Clinicians’ Training and Confidence Associated With Treating School-Age Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah J. Brisk
    Geneva Support Services Cooperative, Geneva, NE
  • E. Charles Healey
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Karen A. Hux
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Contact author: E. Charles Healey, PhD, 253 Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0731.
    Contact author: E. Charles Healey, PhD, 253 Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0731.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1997
Clinicians’ Training and Confidence Associated With Treating School-Age Children Who Stutter
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1997, Vol. 28, 164-176. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2802.164
History: Received January 31, 1996 , Accepted August 27, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1997, Vol. 28, 164-176. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2802.164
History: Received January 31, 1996; Accepted August 27, 1996

The purpose of this survey was to obtain updated information on school-based speech-language pathologists’ training, confidence, attitudes, and perceptions associated with treating school-age children who stutter. A second goal was to investigate the impact of impending specialization training in fluency on service delivery to children who stutter. A total of 278 out of 500 (56%) randomly selected school clinicians certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) responded to the survey. The results showed a general improvement over previous reports in clinicians’ training, confidence, and attitudes concerning providing assessment and intervention services to school-age children who stutter. However, clinicians who received their degrees in the mid-to-late 1970s were less positive regarding their preparation to evaluate and treat preschool children who stutter than those clinicians who received their degrees within the last 10 years.

The results also showed that respondents have fewer successes with adolescents who stutter than with any other student age group. Although a large majority of respondents would consult and request assistance from a "fluency specialist" if one were available, only 40% reported that specialists in fluency were needed in the schools. The results suggest that university training programs need to continue offering clinical experiences with school-age children who stutter and courses devoted exclusively to fluency disorders in order to develop clinicians who feel confident evaluating and treating fluency disorders.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This article is based on a master’s thesis completed by the first author. Funding for this project was provided by a University of Nebraska Research-Grant-in-Aid #LWT-10-341-9210 awarded to the second author. The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance of Dixie Sanger throughout the project.
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