"Minimal" High-Frequency Hearing Loss and School-Age Children Speech Recognition in a Classroom Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1997
"Minimal" High-Frequency Hearing Loss and School-Age Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carole E. Johnson, PhD
    Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5232
  • Ramona L. Stein
    Kent State University, Kent, OH
  • Alicia Broadway
    Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5232
  • Tamatha S. Markwalter
    Department of Communication Disorders, 1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5232
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1997
"Minimal" High-Frequency Hearing Loss and School-Age Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 77-85. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.77
History: Received February 17, 1994 , Accepted April 10, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 77-85. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.77
History: Received February 17, 1994; Accepted April 10, 1996

The purpose of this study was to assess the consonant and vowel identification abilities of 12 children with minimal high-frequency hearing loss, 12 children with normal hearing, and 12 young adults with normal hearing using nonsense syllables recorded in a classroom with reverberation time of 0.7 s in two conditions of: (1) quiet and (2) noise (+13 dB S/N against a multi-talker babble). The young adults achieved significantly higher mean consonant and vowel identification scores than both groups of children. The children with normal hearing had significantly higher mean consonant identification scores in quiet than the children with minimal high-frequency hearing loss, but the groups performances did not differ in noise. Further, the two groups of children did not differ in vowel identification performance. Listeners’ responses to consonant stimuli were converted to confusion matrices and submitted to a sequential information analysis (SINFA, Wang & Bilger, 1973). The SINFA determined that the amount of information transmitted, both overall and for individual features, differed as a function of listener group ad listening condition.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The first author wishes to acknowledge the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation for their support in the completion of this project through the New Investigator Grant Program, 1992–1993. She also wishes to thank Auburn University’s Office of the Vice President for Research, Dean’s Office in the College of Liberal Arts, and the Department of Communication Disorders for the support of her research laboratory. The author also wishes to express her appreciation for the research assistants involved in the study: Holly Peacock and Sarah Cosci.
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