The Generalization and Maintenance of the Peer Social Behaviors of Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a social skills and comparison intervention on peer social behaviours of 43 young children who were deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH). Both interventions were conducted in small groups consisting of children who were D/HH and hearing. Data were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1997
The Generalization and Maintenance of the Peer Social Behaviors of Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shirin D. Antia
    University of Arizona, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Tucson, AZ 85721
  • Kathryn H. Kreimeyer
    University of Arizona, Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Tucson, AZ 85721
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1997
The Generalization and Maintenance of the Peer Social Behaviors of Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 59-69. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.59
History: Received September 30, 1994 , Accepted January 30, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 59-69. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.59
History: Received September 30, 1994; Accepted January 30, 1996

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a social skills and comparison intervention on peer social behaviours of 43 young children who were deaf and hard of hearing (D/HH). Both interventions were conducted in small groups consisting of children who were D/HH and hearing. Data were obtained on 15 social behaviors in four categories: peer interaction, play, child initiations/peer responses, and peer initiations/child responses. Social behaviors were recorded during free play (a) before the intervention, (b) immediately after the intervention ceased, and (c) 4 weeks after the intervention ceased. Children receiving the social skills intervention decreased their frequency of solitary and parallel play. These changes were maintained of year later in an outdoor play setting.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported in part by Grant No. H023C80087-90 from the United States Department of Education. The authors wish to thank the teachers, children, and support personnel who participated in the study.
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