The Ability of Children With Language Impairment to Manipulate Topic in a Structured Task This study investigated the way in which 10 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 10 typical children of similar chronological ages (CA), and 10 typical children at similar levels of language functioning (LS) maintained topics that were introduced to them by an adult investigator. Two different types of topics were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1997
The Ability of Children With Language Impairment to Manipulate Topic in a Structured Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton, PhD
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Jann M. Powell
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1997
The Ability of Children With Language Impairment to Manipulate Topic in a Structured Task
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 3-11. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.03
History: Received January 31, 1995 , Accepted January 11, 1996
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 3-11. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.03
History: Received January 31, 1995; Accepted January 11, 1996

This study investigated the way in which 10 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 10 typical children of similar chronological ages (CA), and 10 typical children at similar levels of language functioning (LS) maintained topics that were introduced to them by an adult investigator. Two different types of topics were introduced in interaction with each child. One topic type involved verbal introduction of an object, the other involved verbal introduction of an event. Although most subject in all groups contributed appropriate utterances in response to the examiner’s topics, subjects with SLI contributed more inappropriate utterances than subject in either of the other groups. Children with SLI demonstrated particular difficulty with verbal topics when compared with their CA and LS peers.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported, in part, by a research grant from the Brigham Young University College of Education. We would also like to acknowledge Amy Buckley for her help in subject identification and selection.
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