Satisfaction With Standardized Language Testing A Survey of Speech-Language Pathologists Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1997
Satisfaction With Standardized Language Testing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rei-Jane Huang
    Communication Disorders & Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-5252
  • Joseph Hopkins
    Communication Disorders & Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-5252
  • Marilyn A. Nippold, PhD
    Communication Disorders & Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-5252
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Healthcare Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1997
Satisfaction With Standardized Language Testing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 12-29. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.12
History: Received April 24, 1995 , Accepted October 6, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 1997, Vol. 28, 12-29. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2801.12
History: Received April 24, 1995; Accepted October 6, 1995

There is little documentation regarding which standardized tests of language development clinicians prefer and their degree of satisfaction with tests and the testing process. This study reports the results of a survey of 216 clinicians in a variety of work settings across the state of Oregon. Clinicians rated their degree of satisfaction with several factors associated with testing: time available for test administration and interpretation; funding available for purchasing tests; and psychometric properties of tests.

The findings indicated that approximately one-half of the respondents expressed neutrality regarding overall satisfaction, with the remaining clinicians almost evenly split between expressing some degree of dissatisfaction or satisfaction. School clinicians were significantly less satisfied than clinicians in clinic/hospital settings. Clinicians with caseloads greater than 40 expressed significantly greater dissatisfaction with tests and the testing environment. Clinicians also indicated the tests most commonly used with four age groups that covered the birth-to-19 years age range. Possible sources of clinician dissatisfaction are also explored.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We are indeed grateful to the members and staff of the Oregon Speech-Language and Hearing Association (OSHA) for completing and returning the questionnaires. In addition, we are grateful to the support staff of the Center on Human Development, the Communication Disorders & Sciences Program, and the University Printing Office of the University of Oregon for their many efforts that made this project successful.
This project was supported in part by a grant to the first author from the Clare Wilkins Chamberlin Memorial Endowment Fund of the University of Oregon College of Education. Sabbatical leave funds from the Portland Public Schools to the second author provided additional support.
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