Serving Native American Children and Families Considering Cultural Variables Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1996
Serving Native American Children and Families
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol Robinson-Zañartu
    Department of Counseling & School Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego. CA 92182-0162
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Cultural/Linguistic Variation
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1996
Serving Native American Children and Families
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 373-384. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.373
History: Received June 15, 1994 , Accepted March 10, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 373-384. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.373
History: Received June 15, 1994; Accepted March 10, 1995

As a group, Native American people are perhaps the least understood and most underserved populations in schools. Native American is a collective term, representing a large variety of cultures, language groups, customs, traditions, levels of acculturation, and levels of traditional language use. In the context of this variation, I raise and discuss a number of common patterns in their traditions and histories: world view and belief systems, acculturation stress, school-home discontinuity, learning styles, and communication patterns, which are useful reference points from which to develop more culturally compatible evaluation approaches. The ecosystems and dynamic/mediational approaches are suggested as promising.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
I would like to express my deep gratitude for the continuing guidance and teachings of Larry W. Emerson (Navajo) of Niha’alchiniba Educational Programs, from whom I have begun to learn new ways of accessing both what and how to learn in a more deeply and richly contextualized manner, and to my many other teachers on this path, especially to Marilyn Robinson (Cayuga), Juanita Majel (Luiseño). Shirley Murphy (Oglala Lakota), and Flora Howe (Absentee Shawnee).
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