The Promises and Pitfalls of Language Sample Analysis as an Assessment Tool for Linguistic Minority Children Language sample analysis (LSA) is often viewed as a nonbiased procedure for identifying language delay among linguistic minorty children. This article offers a critical discussion of LSA’s use as an identification tool. Its advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. The concept of a minimal competency core is introduced as a potential ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1996
The Promises and Pitfalls of Language Sample Analysis as an Assessment Tool for Linguistic Minority Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ida J. Stockman, PhD
    Audiology and Speech Sciences, 371 Communication Arts & Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing. MI 48824-1212
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Clinical Forum: Cultural/Linguistic Variation
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1996
The Promises and Pitfalls of Language Sample Analysis as an Assessment Tool for Linguistic Minority Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 355-366. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.355
History: Received October 18, 1993 , Accepted March 10, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 355-366. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.355
History: Received October 18, 1993; Accepted March 10, 1995

Language sample analysis (LSA) is often viewed as a nonbiased procedure for identifying language delay among linguistic minorty children. This article offers a critical discussion of LSA’s use as an identification tool. Its advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. The concept of a minimal competency core is introduced as a potential criterion-referenced procedure for screening African American preschool children. The clinical utility of such an approach is discussed in terms of the research and educational issues that should be addressed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This project was supported in part by funds from the National Institute of Education, Grant #G-80-0135. I am grateful to Nicole McDonnell and Michelle Smith for their contributions to processing the data and assisting with the reliability study. I am grateful to Margaret Lahey, Karen Hux, Alan Kamhi, and Toya Wyatt for their helpful suggestions on an earlier draft of this manuscript.
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