Enhancing Communication Toward Optimal Language Learning for Limited English Proficient Students Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   October 01, 1996
Enhancing Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Li-Rong Lilly Cheng, PhD
    San Diego State University, Department of Communicative Disorders, San Diego, CA 92065
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Clinical Forum: Cultural/Linguistic Variation
Clinical Forum   |   October 01, 1996
Enhancing Communication
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 347-354. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.347
History: Received April 2, 1993 , Accepted February 17, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 347-354. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.347
History: Received April 2, 1993; Accepted February 17, 1994

Difficult discourse is a term that describes sociological and psychological difficulties that arise in the conflict of culture, language, and ideology between the American educational system and minority language students. This article will address the discourse demands of students and families in school, the changing demographics requiring our understanding of difficult discourse, and philosophies/controversies in bilingual education. Furthermore, it will focus on the difficulties of children who are limited English proficient and their parents in comprehending school discourse, school culture, and expected interactional styles. Additionally, examples of difficult discourse and a case example will be provided. Finally, specific strategies for reducing difficult discourse will be introduced.

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