The Efficiency of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test as a Language Screening Tool The purpose of this study was to determine the number of false positives and false negatives derived from the language domain of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test (RDDST) in a community preschool screening. Six months after the initial screening, 199 RDDST protocols were reviewed and the status of each ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1996
The Efficiency of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test as a Language Screening Tool
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Feeney
    University of Nebraska - Lincoln
  • John Bernthal
    University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, 301 Barkley Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0738
Article Information
Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1996
The Efficiency of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test as a Language Screening Tool
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 330-332. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.330
History: Received February 23, 1995 , Accepted October 24, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 330-332. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.330
History: Received February 23, 1995; Accepted October 24, 1995

The purpose of this study was to determine the number of false positives and false negatives derived from the language domain of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test (RDDST) in a community preschool screening. Six months after the initial screening, 199 RDDST protocols were reviewed and the status of each child was documented. The study identified nine false positives and three false negatives, which resulted in a positive hit rate of 93.5 %. The results of the study indicate that the RDDST is an effective tool in predicting the need for formal assessment.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to express their appreciation to the Lincoln Public Schools District for their cooperation and interest in this project. Special thanks for the assistance and support provided by Tom Fortune, supervisor of early childhood special education, Elaine Peters, coordinator of Head Start, and Linda Douglas, director of special education.
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