Test-Retest Comparisons Using the CELF-RST and BLT-2S With Kindergartners The purpose of this study was to explore the performance stability of 101 kindergarten children on two commonly used screening tests: the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Revised Screening Test (CELF-RST) and the Bankson Language Test-Second Edition (BLT-2S). Both screening tests were administered at the beginning of the school year and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 1996
Test-Retest Comparisons Using the CELF-RST and BLT-2S With Kindergartners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia A. Summers
    University of North Texas, Denton, TX
  • George W. Larson
    University of North Texas, Denton, TX
  • Shirley A. Miguel
    University of North Texas, Denton, TX
  • Sandra L. Terrell
    University of North Texas, Denton, TX
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 1996
Test-Retest Comparisons Using the CELF-RST and BLT-2S With Kindergartners
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 324-329. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.324
History: Received February 7, 1995 , Accepted October 10, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 1996, Vol. 27, 324-329. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2704.324
History: Received February 7, 1995; Accepted October 10, 1995

The purpose of this study was to explore the performance stability of 101 kindergarten children on two commonly used screening tests: the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Revised Screening Test (CELF-RST) and the Bankson Language Test-Second Edition (BLT-2S). Both screening tests were administered at the beginning of the school year and again 7 months later. Several interesting findings emerged that may have significant implications for the speech-language pathologist working in the schools: (a) Children scored significantly higher on both tests during the second administration, despite the absence of any intervention from a speech-language pathologist; (b) almost one fourth of the children who failed the first test passed the second administration, despite the absence of intervention; and (3) approximately one-third of the kindergartners were inconsistently identified (i.e., passed one test but failed the other). Implications for the speech-language pathologist are discussed.

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