Treatment of Voice Disorders in Medically Complex Children A recent prevalence study revealed that laryngeal pathologies, including subglottic stenosis, laryngomalacia, vocal cord paralysis, and papillomatosis, are common in children. Children with these and other organically based alterations in laryngeal structure and/or function, frequently referred to the speech-language pathologist, often present with complex medical profiles. There is, however, a ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 1996
Treatment of Voice Disorders in Medically Complex Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Geralyn L. Harvey
    Children’s Hospital, Speech and Language Department, Fegan 7, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Voice Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 1996
Treatment of Voice Disorders in Medically Complex Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 282-291. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.282
History: Received December 1, 1993 , Accepted August 25, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 282-291. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.282
History: Received December 1, 1993; Accepted August 25, 1994

A recent prevalence study revealed that laryngeal pathologies, including subglottic stenosis, laryngomalacia, vocal cord paralysis, and papillomatosis, are common in children. Children with these and other organically based alterations in laryngeal structure and/or function, frequently referred to the speech-language pathologist, often present with complex medical profiles. There is, however, a paucity of information to guide the clinician in diagnosing and treating voice problems associated with such laryngeal pathologies in children. This article presents individual case studies that detail information regarding management decisions and specific treatment options that have been implemented with medically complex children with voice disorders. The case studies demonstrate that there is an opportunity to improve vocal function in medically complex children.

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