Reading and Communication A Comparison of Proficient and Less-Proficient Fourth-Grade Readers' Opinions Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1996
Reading and Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Claudia J. Canady
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Utah, 1201 Behavioral Science Building, Salt Lake City, UT 84112
  • Susan G. Krantz
    Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1996
Reading and Communication
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 231-238. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.231
History: Received September 6, 1994 , Accepted July 12, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 231-238. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.231
History: Received September 6, 1994; Accepted July 12, 1995

The views of children toward literacy can provide insight into the relationship between areas of reading and communication abilities and suggest possibilities for classroom language intervention and the use of written materials. This investigation examined differences in the opinions of fourth-grade readers with good and poor reading skills. Interviews were conducted with 270 fourth-grade students, 142 above average (AAR) readers and 128 below average (BAR) readers. Data analysis revealed significant differences between the two groups of readers on nine of 22 questions. The subjects accurately identified themselves as good or poor readers. The AAR group reported understanding more of what they read, whereas the BAR group reported problems in comprehending written information. As oral communicators, the AARs reported talking more and being understood more often when they talked than the BARs. Significant differences were found between the AAR and BAR groups regarding how often they read at home by themselves and how often they read for fun. However, no differences existed between the groups in their opinions of the value and importance of reading.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors wish to thank the Salt Lake City School District for its cooperation in providing fourth-grade students for individual interviews. The help in interviewing subjects and compiling data given by Stephanie Broome, Linda Herrick, Eileen Hunsaker, and Jennifer Pinnock, graduate students in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of Utah, is also greatly appreciated.
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