Families' Perceptions of Early Intervention Services for Children With Hearing Loss A national survey was distributed to families of preschool-age children who are deaf or hard of hearing in order to investigate parent's perceptions of family involvement in early intervention programs, as intended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (formerly P.L. 99-457). Questions were organized into five categories: (1) the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1996
Families' Perceptions of Early Intervention Services for Children With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melody Harrison, PhD
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, CB #7190 Wing D, Medical School, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC 27599–7190
  • Margaret Dannhardt
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Jackson Roush
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1996
Families' Perceptions of Early Intervention Services for Children With Hearing Loss
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 203-214. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.203
History: Received April 5, 1994 , Accepted April 24, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 203-214. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.203
History: Received April 5, 1994; Accepted April 24, 1995

A national survey was distributed to families of preschool-age children who are deaf or hard of hearing in order to investigate parent's perceptions of family involvement in early intervention programs, as intended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (formerly P.L. 99-457). Questions were organized into five categories: (1) the family's experiences with their early intervention program, (2) information provided by their early intervention program, (3) experiences in writing the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), (4) demographic information concerning the family, and (5) demographic information concerning the child.

Surveys were returned from all geographic regions of the United States, representing parents from a wide variety of backgrounds. Results indicate that although an IFSP had not been developed by almost one-half of the respondents, those who responded reported overall satisfaction with their early intervention program.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work was supported by a grant from the University Research Council of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Additional support was provided by the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center of The University of North Carolina, and by the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services, of the State of North Carolina.
The authors thank Ron Craig for his statistical expertise and Angel Beza for assistance in designing the survey. We are especially grateful to the 401 parents who took time from their busy lives to complete the survey and to those professionals who were so invaluable in distributing it.
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