Social Skills of Children With Specific Language Impairment The social skills of 19 elementary school children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 19 chronological age-matched peers were examined. Children in both groups were selected from those children between the ages of 8 and 12 years. Each child with SLI was individually matched to a classmate of the same ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1996
Social Skills of Children With Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
    Brigham Young University, Audiology and Speech Pathology, 136 TLRB, Provo, UT 84602
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Cindy M. Todd
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1996
Social Skills of Children With Specific Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 195-202. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.195
History: Received November 7, 1994 , Accepted April 24, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 1996, Vol. 27, 195-202. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2703.195
History: Received November 7, 1994; Accepted April 24, 1995

The social skills of 19 elementary school children with specific language impairment (SLI) and 19 chronological age-matched peers were examined. Children in both groups were selected from those children between the ages of 8 and 12 years. Each child with SLI was individually matched to a classmate of the same age. First, the Social Skills Rating System-Teacher Form (Gresham & Elliott, 1990) was administered to provide a general measure of social skill. Following this measure, the quantity of peer relationships was assessed in both groups using an informal picture task. This measure provided an indication of the peers with whom each child interacted while taking part in a variety of activities. The quality of peer relationships was then assessed using the Williams and Asher Loneliness Questionnaire (Williams & Asher, 1992). It was found that children with SLI differed from their peers on all three measures. These results suggested that the children with SLI had poorer social skills and fewer peer relationships, and were less satisfied with the peer relationships in which they participated when compared with their age-matched classmates.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported, in part, by a research grant from the College of Education, Brigham Young University. The authors would like to thank Steven R. Asher for his comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. We would also like to thank the administrators, teachers, students, and parents of Alpine School District for their cooperation. Finally, we would like to acknowledge Ms. Julie Campbell Spencer and Ms. Lee A. Robinson for their help in subject identification and selection.
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