Traumatic Brain Injury Knowledge and Self-Perceptions of School Speech-Language Pathologists Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1996
Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Hux
    318 Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583–0738
  • Mary Walker
    318 Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583–0738
  • Dixie D. Sanger
    318 Barkley Memorial Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583–0738
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1996
Traumatic Brain Injury
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1996, Vol. 27, 171-184. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2702.171
History: Received October 3, 1994 , Accepted April 24, 1995
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1996, Vol. 27, 171-184. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2702.171
History: Received October 3, 1994; Accepted April 24, 1995

School-based speech-language pathologists from 10 states responded to a survey concerning their readiness to provide services to students with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Survey responses provided a means of exploring speech-language pathologists’ knowledge of TBI and facilitated recognition of accurate and inaccurate conceptions held by school-based speech-language pathologists concerning the characteristics and behaviors, criteria for identification and verification, and procedures for the assessment, treatment, and reintegration of students with TBI. Findings indicated that training had a positive effect on speech-language pathologists’ knowledge of assessment, treatment, and overall management of students with TBI; however, a large percentage of school-based speech-language pathologists remain uncertain about providing services to students with TBI even after receiving specific TBI training. Furthermore, school-based speech-language pathologists continue to hold many misconceptions concerning TBI and its consequences.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Completion of this research was supported by funds from a University of Nebraska-Lincoln Research Council Grant (LWT/10-341-92201).
The authors thank Kim Hoogeveen for his assistance in generating ideas for inclusion on the survey instrument used for data collection.
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