A Performance/Competence Model of Observational Assessment The nature of the questions asked concerning a child determines the procedures used to generate the answers. This article describes a variety of assessment procedures and discusses the situations under which each procedure would be used. The Project NEW TeamS (neurological, ecological, wholistic team system) observational assessment procedure designed for ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 1996
A Performance/Competence Model of Observational Assessment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol E. Westby, PhD
    University of New Mexico Medical School, Albuquerque, NM Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, 1808 Princeton NE, NM 87106
  • Meave StevensDominguez
    University of New Mexico Medical School, Albuquerque, NM
  • Patti Oetter
    University of New Mexico Medical School, Albuquerque, NM
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Observing and Interpreting Behaviors
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 1996
A Performance/Competence Model of Observational Assessment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1996, Vol. 27, 144-156. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2702.144
History: Received March 18, 1994 , Accepted August 25, 1994
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 1996, Vol. 27, 144-156. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.2702.144
History: Received March 18, 1994; Accepted August 25, 1994

The nature of the questions asked concerning a child determines the procedures used to generate the answers. This article describes a variety of assessment procedures and discusses the situations under which each procedure would be used. The Project NEW TeamS (neurological, ecological, wholistic team system) observational assessment procedure designed for infants, toddlers, and preschool children is presented. The goal of this assessment process is to link assessment with intervention by determining what supports and what compromises a child’s perfomance.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
This work was supported in part by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education (H024B10099) awarded to the Training and Technical Assistance Unit, University of New Mexico.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access